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Get Answers From A Skilled Alabama Family Law Attorney

Though no two family law matters are the same, there are common questions asked regarding divorce in Alabama. Below are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about divorce.

If you have a question that isn’t addressed below, feel free to call family law attorney Richelle Gossman to speak with her about your specific circumstances

What Are Sufficient Grounds For Divorce In Alabama?

The state of Alabama does not grant a “no fault divorce,” but a divorce can be granted on grounds of “incompatibility” or because of an “irretrievable breakdown.” There are a total of twenty-three grounds for divorce, including abandonment, adultery, drunkenness, etc.; however, most uncontested divorces simply claim incompatibility or irretrievable breakdown and do not fault either person.

What Is A Mediated Divorce?

Divorce mediation is a process in which a neutral third party oversees the negotiation process to help the parties reach a settlement. If the parties negotiate and sign an agreement, no trial is necessary and the parties do not need to go to court. Not only can mediation save significant amounts of time and money but also can provide a foundation for more civil relations as the parties move forward.

Do I Have To Hire An Attorney To File For Divorce?

No, you can file for a divorce in Alabama without hiring an attorney. However, not having a lawyer can actually cost you more time and money than what it is worth. Many unexpected legal issues arise, and extensive documentation must be detailed and very specific.

A divorce lawyer can help you negotiate:

  • Child custody, child support and maintenance
  • Spousal support
  • The division of property

Family law attorney Richelle Gossman offers flat-rate fees for uncontested divorce matters and payment plans for complex issues. 

How Is Marital Property Divided In A Divorce?

In a divorce, Alabama divides marital property (property that is subject to division) equitably. This means that a court will allocate property based on what is fair and reasonable, not 50/50. When making the determination, the court will examine various factors 

More Questions? Reach Out.

For specific questions, contact attorney Richelle Gossman with Gossman Law Firm, LLC. Call 205-606-6896 today. Free consultations provided.

Disclaimer: The following language is required by rule 7.2 of professional conduct: “No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.”